There She Blows!

bluewhale_balaenoptera_musculus

The Blue Whale could be the largest example of Dominance and Submission on the planet.

What is he talking about now you may think?

Obviously there is no direct connection, however, I read an article by the BBC this week in the changes being made to the Hintze Hall at the Natural History Museum in London. I can remember the first time I walked in to that very museum on a school trip at the age of 8 and seeing a Diplodocus skeleton towering above me.   Unbeknown to me it was plaster cast, but to an 8 year old boy looking up at something so large and so strange, it left a real impression.  40 something years on, and numerous return visits to the same museum with my children, that same feeling of wonderment was still there as if preserved in a glass case like an exhibit.  This year ‘Dippy’ (The Diplodocus) has been replaced with 150 year old (real) Blue Whale Skeleton, and it’s massive!  It will make children and adults alike stand in awe as I once did and wonder what else could be found in the arches, corridors and halls of this Victorian building.

My point, which I often take time in arriving at, is this; Young people need things at an early age to inspire and influence them without having it rammed down their throats.  My own parents were a good influence on me with regard to raising children.  They encouraged me to try new activities, many of which I didn’t pursue, but some I did. I know that I am lucky to have had them as role models as many people are not so lucky. For our children our D/s relationship is the Blue Whale.  It is something that, on occasion makes them laugh, makes them realise that there are bigger things in life than their immediate needs and it shows them how, by working together they can produce something  that everyone can enjoy.

We do not live in an ultra Alpha male environment. We have five sons and two daughters and there is no male/female pecking order. Each of the children, who are of a wide age range, have their own personalities and on occasion,  minor conflict does happen.  Our children know, from their parent’s behaviour that aggression and negative behaviour is not the answer to a positive resolution.  The boys know that hitting another person first is assault and not self defence in the eyes of the law and the girls know where danger lurks and what kind of behaviour attracts unwanted attention.  Our kids are not the Osmonds and certainly not the Brady Bunch by any stretch of the imagination, and yet by having kinky parents, it doesn’t seem, so far, to have done them any harm.  You will remember I said than when I looked at ‘Dippy’ for the first time I saw a real dinosaur skeleton and despite the wires hanging  him from the ceiling, I saw the best in him. Our kids see and imitate the best in our D/s relationship, and hopefully they will never see their Mother suspended in a similar way to ‘Dippy’ to burst that bubble!

 

 

 

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3 thoughts on “There She Blows!

  1. I enjoy reading things like this. Life is more than swinging a flogger well or working on protocols. You have shed more light on who you are and that is always welcome.

    I too love the museums. We’ve done Paris (Louve, Orsay, Versailles and New York Met. London and the Smithsonian are on the bucket list. We did enjoy the Tower of London quite a lot when we were there years ago. St Paul’s as well. (Both with their history.)

    Liked by 3 people

  2. So very much is revealed in this statement: “Young people need things at an early age to inspire and influence them without having it rammed down their throats.”

    And then again in this… “The boys know that hitting another person first is assault and not self defence in the eyes of the law and the girls know where danger lurks and what kind of behaviour attracts unwanted attention.”

    We don’t so much make children as guide them and clearly you have given keen thought to what guidance might serve them well. Which is good. Children without good guidance are a bane upon us all, but children raised with thought and caring are our best hope for a better future.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for comments to my post. To me it seems common sense, however, I make that statement from a privileged position. I will say that how you are raised does not determine how you will raise your children. It requires a full understanding of social boundaries which can be gleaned from social interaction with positive people. I have a close friend who grew up in an abusive environment. He has a well paid technical job and two beautiful, well behaved children. His 16 year old daughter wears leather, plays base guitar and attends music gigs with her dad into the early hours. Her iPad and phone, however, go on charge at 21.00, downstairs on a school night. Balance and boundaries can be achieved if you work at it.

      Liked by 2 people

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